2017 Wildfires

The 2017 wildfire season proved to be one of the most challenging in California history. Multiple fires in northern and southern California resulted in State of Emergency Proclamations by the Governor and Major Disaster Declarations by the President to ensure resources were available to wildfire survivors. This page contains the recovery resources and information made available to those affected by the 2017 California wildfires. Survivors are also encouraged to check with their local jurisdiction for additional recovery resources and information related to the 2017 California wildfires.

Click here to see a spreadsheet of all services and assistance available from State and Federal agencies and programs for the October 2017 Wildfires

Click here to see a spreadsheet of all services and assistance available from State and Federal agencies and programs for the December 2017 Wildfires

Tax Resources and Information

2017 Wildfire Property Tax Reassessment Information
Revenue and Taxation Code section 170(a)(1) allows homeowners to apply for reassessment of their property if it has been the damaged or destroyed by Governor-declared disaster.  The county assessor will immediately reappraise the property to reflect its damaged condition.  In addition, when it is rebuilt in a like or similar manner, the property will retain its prior value (Proposition 13) for tax purposes.  If a manufactured home is totally destroyed in a Governor-declared disaster, it may be replaced by a comparable unit without an increase in either the property taxes or the vehicle license and registration fees. More information here.

Section 194.1 of the Revenue and Taxation Code allows any owner of eligible property who files a claim for calamity reassessment pursuant to Section 170 on or before the next property tax installment delinquency date to ask the county assessor to defer payment of that installment of property taxes on the regular secured roll for the current fiscal year (deferral does not apply to impound accounts handled by your lender).  The new due date for the deferred taxes will be 30 days after you receive the corrected property tax bill.  If delinquency date falls on a weekend or holiday, as it does in this case, the delinquency date is the next business date. Please contact your county assessor to inquire about delinquency dates specific to your county.

Citizenship Status and Eligibility for Disaster Assistance FAQ

Citizenship Status and Eligibility for Disaster Assistance FAQ – Español

Frequently Asked Questions – Schools

FAQs for School Districts and Superintendents (PDF)

If outdoor air is considered satisfactory, and air pollution poses little or no risk, all facilities, classrooms, and offices should be ventilated for at least a 24-hour period. Heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system filters should be replaced as soon as possible, and, if necessary, replaced frequently thereafter to remove additional ash and odorous particle build-up. Schools would benefit by changing to higher efficiency filters—as high as can be used safely in existing HVAC systems. Filters with at least a minimum efficiency reporting value or MERV rating of 8, and preferably higher, should be used because higher efficiency filters will remove more of the smaller particles from the air that pose health risks. Check with HVAC system manufacturers regarding suitable filters for the systems.

Ash and other particles should be gently swept. High efficiency particulate air or HEPA filters should be installed on all vacuums. Hard surfaces, such as hard floors, desks, and bookcases should be cleaned with a wet cloth or towel. Objects that the students use, such as toys, athletic equipment, and drinking fountains that may have been exposed to settled ash or dust should also be thoroughly cleaned. In no instance should ozone-generating devices be used to “deodorize” classrooms because ozone can react with chemicals in the air and on indoor surfaces to create formaldehyde, ultrafine particles, and other harmful substances.

There is no indoor air quality standard; however, schools and school districts can monitor local air quality information provided by their local air districts to determine the safety and quality of outdoor air. Schools and school districts can also visit https://airnow.gov to obtain real-time, local air quality conditions.

If air quality becomes unsafe or if local regulatory monitors indicate high levels of particulate matter in the air, keep children indoors where the air is filtered.

Adequate ventilation and air filtration are critical. HVAC system filters should be changed frequently. Schools would benefit by changing to higher efficiency filters—as high as can be used safely in existing HVAC systems. Filters with at least a MERV rating of 8, and preferably higher, should be used because higher efficiency filters will remove more of the smaller particles from the air that pose health risks. Check with HVAC system manufacturers regarding suitable filters for the systems.

To expedite recovery, state and federal partners will coordinate closely with affected jurisdictions to remove fire debris from single-family residential lots and public facilities. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) will conduct debris and ash removal operations in the affected counties. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency will conduct household hazardous waste disposal operations in affected counties.

No.

Supplemental and concentration grant amounts are calculated based on the percentage of “unduplicated pupils” enrolled in the LEA on Census Day (first Wednesday in October) as certified for Fall 1. The percentage is based on data from the current year and two prior years, and equals:

  • Unduplicated count of pupils who are (1) English learners, (2) meet income or categorical eligibility requirements for free or reduced-price meals under the National School Lunch Program (NSLP), or (3) foster youth. “Unduplicated count” means that each pupil is counted only once even if the pupil meets more than one of these criteria See Education Code sections 2574(b)(2) (schools operated by county superintendent) and 42238.02(b)(1) (school districts and charter schools).
  • Divided by total enrollment in the LEA See Education Code sections 2574(b)(1) (schools operated by county superintendent) and 42238.02(b)(5) (school districts and charter schools).

Supplemental and concentration grant funding is based on district-level data. Therefore, intradistrict transfers should not have an effect on LCFF funding. With respect to interdistrict transfers, the unduplicated data is reflected in the district in which the students were enrolled on Census Day. If a student transfers after this day, they will not impact the Unduplicated Pupil Percentage (UPP) of the receiving district; their counts will remain in the original district. However, because average daily attendance (ADA) is a factor in how much supplemental and concentration grant funding an LEA receives, the transferring students will generate supplemental and concentration funding for the receiving district, but it will be based on the district’s UPP for the students enrolled as of Census Day.

Homeless students are deemed categorically eligible for the National School Lunch Program. LEAs must submit NSLP program student records in CALPADS for students who became homeless due to the fires with a start date on or before October 31, in order to be included in the 2017-18 Census Day count for the LEA in which the student was enrolled on that date. To the extent that a homeless student did not already meet the LCFF unduplicated pupil criteria prior to becoming homeless due to the fires and is now captured, an LEA could see an increase in their UPP. However, because the UPP is based on three years of data the funding impacts will vary across LEAs. For purposes of reporting homeless data, LEAs should also submit homeless program records for students who became homeless due to the fire, using the date the student became homeless as the program start date.

The federal McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act (20 U.S.C. Section 11431 et seq.) defines homeless children and youths as individuals who lack a fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence. This definition also includes:

  • Children and youths who are sharing the housing of other persons due to loss of housing, economic hardship, or a similar reason.
  • Children and youths who may be living in motels, hotels, trailer parks, shelters, or awaiting foster care placement.
  • Children and youths who have a primary nighttime residence that is a public or private place not designed for or ordinarily used as a regular sleeping accommodation for human beings.
  • Children and youths who are living in cars, parks, public spaces, abandoned buildings, substandard housing, bus or train stations, or similar settings, or
  • Migratory children who qualify as homeless because they are children who are living in similar circumstances listed below above.

If a student becomes homeless, even temporarily, due to wildfires or another state/federally declared natural disaster, a verbal confirmation of homelessness from a student, or the student’s family, is all that is required for LEAs to certify the student as eligible for free meals based on a homeless designation.

Program operators should work backwards in obtaining the homeless documentation with the Homeless Liaison. After receiving a verbal confirmation of a student’s homelessness, program operators should assure the family that their child is eligible for free meals for the remainder of the school year, and the first 30 operating days of the following year, and then subsequently obtain the necessary documentation for the homeless designation: the school registration form (if applicable) and documentation from the Homeless Liaison.

Operators can obtain a list of their county and district Homeless Liaisons on the California Department of Education’s web page at https://www.cde.ca.gov/sp/hs/. This Homeless Liaison contact list can be particularly helpful for new agency staff who may not know who to contact in order to help students who have become homeless.

Also, if a student is residing within another household as a result of a disaster, the student’s homeless eligibility does not transfer to the host family. However, when a household hosting a homeless family applies for free and reduced-price (F/RP) meal benefits for their own children, the host family may include all of the members of the homeless family as household members if the host family provides financial support to the homeless family. Financial support may include shelter, utilities, clothing, and/or food. When applying for F/RP meal benefits, the host family must also include any income received by the homeless family. The eligibility status for the host family is based on its income or other sources of categorical eligibility.

For further assistance on meal eligibility, contact the School Nutrition Programs Unit at 800-952-5609, Option 2, to be directed to a program specialist.

CLOSURES

Charter Schools and School Districts:

Local control funding formula (LCFF) entitlements are based in large part on ADA. LCFF funding for charter schools and school districts should not be significantly impacted at the P-1 and P-2 reporting and apportionment periods due to fire-related closures because school districts and charter schools that closed schools due to fires should reduce their divisors when calculating ADA by the number of days school was not offered.

After the school year ends, LCFF funding will be impacted if charter schools do not offer 175 days of instruction or school districts do not offer 180 days of instruction in 2017-18. To avoid a loss of funding, charter schools and school districts that offered less than the required instructional days due to the fires should submit a J-13A waiver request to the State Superintendent of Public Instruction (SSPI) for review and approval.

County Offices of Education:

County offices of education that had to close schools due to the fires will experience a loss of LCFF funding because ADA is calculated using a fixed divisor, which will be reflected in the ADA reported at P-1 and P-2. In order to reduce the fixed divisor by the number of days county offices of education closed schools due to fires, county offices of education should submit a J-13A closure request to the SSPI for review and approval. Once the J-13A is approved, the county offices of education may reduce the fixed divisors by the number of days their schools were closed due to fires.

MATERIAL DECREASE IN ADA

Charter schools, school districts, and county offices of education that experienced a loss of ADA due to the fires will have a reduction in ADA that can result in reduced LCFF funding. In order to mitigate the loss of ADA due to the fires, charter schools, school districts, and county offices of education should submit a J-13A waiver material decrease request to the California Department of Education (CDE). Approved material decrease requests will provide charter schools, school districts, and county offices of education with the authority to add apportionment days to their reported ADA, thereby alleviating what would otherwise be a loss in LCFF funding.

J-13A waiver request forms and instructions are available on CDE’s web site at: https://www.cde.ca.gov/fg/aa/pa/j13a.asp. Completed forms with required local approval should be submitted to the county superintendent of schools. After the county superintendent of schools has verified the supporting information and approved the request, the forms should be forwarded to:

School Fiscal Services Division
California Department of Education
1430 N Street, Suite 3800
Sacramento, CA 95814

School districts, charter schools and county offices of education will be notified when J-13A requests are approved.

The School Emergency Response to Violence (Project SERV) grant is dedicated federal funding used to provide education-related services to local education agencies (LEA) in which the learning environment was disrupted due to a traumatic crisis.

The CDE is applying for Project SERV grants on behalf of impacted LEAs and is coordinating with the U.S. Department of Education (ED) to help the funding move expeditiously. State- and LEA-level funding amounts will be determined by ED-based submitted needs assessments and available budgetary resources.

Funding may be used to reimburse LEAs for some of the expenses incurred in order to quickly reopen schools, such as hiring substitute teachers and renting vans to transport students from temporary housing to school. The CDE hosted a Webinar on this subject on October 26, 2017. Webinar slides may be found at https://www.cde.ca.gov/ls/fa/sf/documents/projectservwebinar.pdf

To apply, LEAs must submit a one-page needs assessment (PDF) by Friday, December 15, 2017, to EmergencyServices@cde.ca.gov in order to be considered in the CDE’s Project SERV application. Questions may be directed to Marguerite Ries, Federal Policy Liaison, Government Affairs Division, by phone at 916-319-0650 or by e-mail at EmergencyServices@cde.ca.gov.

The maximum enrollment for a class, grade, and school is a local decision and is determined by school district board policy. Local fire regulations (i.e., maximum occupancy rules) are also a factor. While there is nothing in the Education Code (EC) that establishes absolute limits on class or school size, the EC does prescribe that if certain limits are exceeded in grades kindergarten through eight, a school district’s funding may be affected. The following table details the class size calculations that affect funding:

TopicK–8 Class Size Penalty (CSP)K–3 Grade-Span Adjustment (GSA)
ApplicabilityApplies to all elementary or unified district schools where the district ADA is 101 or more. Necessary small elementary schools are excluded from the reporting requirements.Applies to all elementary or unified district schools, unless the district has collectively bargained an alternative.
RequirementPursuant to EC sections 41376 and 41378:

K-3

Individual class requirement: Average for class not to exceed:
• 33 in kindergarten
• 32 in grades 1 through 3

Districtwide requirements: Average of all individual classes not to exceed:
• 31 in kindergarten
• 30 in grades 1 through 3

4-8

For grades four through eight, in the current fiscal year, average number of students per teacher not to exceed the greater of 29.9 (i.e., the statewide average number of students per teacher in 1964) or the district’s average number of students per teacher in 1964.
Pursuant to EC Section 42238.02(d)(3)(D), upon full implementation of the local control funding formula (LCFF), maintain at each school site an average K–3 class enrollment of 24 or less.

During LCFF phase-in, a school district must make annual progress toward maintaining an average K–3 class enrollment of 24 or less at each school site pursuant to EC Section 42238.02(d)(3)(B) and the calculations set forth in Title 5 California Code of Regulations sections 15498–15498.3.
Penalty/Condition of FundingGenerally, the penalty is equal to the loss of all funding for ADA above 31 in kindergarten classes, above 30 in first through third grade classes, and above the district’s applicable average for grades four through eight. The CSP data is processed and penalties applied, if applicable, at the P-2 or subsequent Principal Apportionment certifications.Districts that do not meet the required K-3 average class enrollment will not receive a 10.4 percent GSA applied to the LCFF base grant funding; this adjustment also impacts supplemental and concentration grant funding, where applicable. Compliance with the K–3 GSA requirement is evaluated through the district’s annual audit.
WaiverMay be waived by the State Board of Education (SBE). See the SBE K-3 and 4-8 waiver policies for more information.May not be waived by SBE or SSPI pursuant to EC Section 42238.02(d)(3)(E).
Additional Information on class sizesClass Size PenaltiesFrequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Additional questions may be directed to the following CDE staff:

  • For questions specific to the funding penalty associated with grades K-8 CSP or the financial impacts of a K-3 GSA audit finding on a district’s LCFF entitlement:

Principal Apportionment Section, PASE@cde.ca.gov

  • For questions specific to the K-3 GSA requirements and regulations:

Julie Briggs, JBriggs@cde.ca.gov

  • For questions specific to filing a K-8 CSP waiver with the SBE:

Janet Finley, jfinley@cde.ca.gov

All districts should track all expenses incurred, including those related to sheltering and transportation. CDE will provide more information as it becomes available.

Video Resources for 2017 Wildfires

Firefighters began battling multiple wildfires on October 8 in numerous counties across the entire state, prompting mass evacuations. Thousands of acres burned and threatened infrastructure as strong winds fueled the fast-moving fires, primarily in Northern California. The wildfires burned more than 245,000 acres, destroyed 8,900 structures and were responsible for 43 deaths.

Massive Fire Response and Recovery Efforts

Resources poured in to California to assist firefighting crews as they battled multiple fires throughout the state. There were more than 11,000 firefighters and nearly 500 law enforcement personnel working the deadly fires. Suppression efforts included more than 1,000 fire engines, 30 air tankers and 73 helicopters, with an additional 177 fire engines from out-of-state mutual aid.
The California Governor’s Office of Emergency Services (Cal OES) coordinated the placement of evacuees in dozens of shelters across the region, while also distributing more than 40,000 meals, 60,000 liters of water, 2,000 ADA compliance cots and 12,000 blankets and sheets.

The California National Guard supported of the firefighting efforts with more than 2,000 soldiers and airmen deployed, including a 500-person infantry from Southern California. Cal Guard and the Nevada National Guard were heavily involved in the air suppression efforts with 23 aircraft offering support via firefighting, damage assessment, fire mapping and transportation. Aircraft dropped more than 800,000 gallons of water/retardant. In addition, Cal Guard also coordinated bringing in additional resources from Oregon and Nevada.

State Operations

On October 9, the State Operations Center activated to support emergency management coordination and mutual aid requests for the communities of Yuba, Sonoma, Napa, Lake, Mendocino, Butte, Nevada, and Solano who were impacted by the Northern California wildfires.

The Inland, Coastal and Southern Regional Operations Centers also activated to support impacted communities.

Cal Guard mobilized to support disaster response and/or relief efforts. To assist local governments and for the protection of public health and the environment, state agencies shall enter into contracts to arrange for the procurement of materials, goods, and services necessary to quickly assist with the response to and recovery from the impacts of these fires. Applicable provisions of the Government Code and the Public Contract Code, including but not limited to travel, advertising, and competitive bidding requirements, are suspended to the extent necessary to address the effects of the fires.

Governor’s Statement on Presidential Declaration

On October 10, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) announced that federal disaster assistance was made available to the state of California to supplement state, tribal, and local recovery efforts in the areas affected by wildfires from October 8, 2017, and continuing.

Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. issued the following statement after the White House approved the gubernatorial request for federal assistance to help with the impacts of wildfires burning in Northern California: “The Federal Emergency Management Agency has responded promptly to assist California in fighting these terrible fires. I appreciate the fast response from the President.”

Emergency Proclamations and Declarations

On October 10, Governor Brown issued an emergency proclamation for Solano County due to the effects of the Atlas Fire, which damaged critical infrastructure, threatened homes and caused the evacuation of residents. On October 9, Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. issued an emergency proclamation for eight counties – Napa, Sonoma, Yuba, Butte, Lake, Mendocino, Nevada and Orange – due to the effects of multiple fires causing damage to critical infrastructure, threatening homes and causing the evacuation of residents. The proclamation allows all state agencies to use and employ state personnel, equipment and facilities for response and recovery efforts.

Disaster Unemployment Assistance benefits now available for those affected by the California Wildfires

Federal Disaster Unemployment Assistance (DUA) benefits are now available for workers and self-employed individuals who lost their jobs or had their work hours substantially reduced as a result of the wildfires in Butte, Lake, Mendocino, Napa, Nevada, Orange, Sonoma, and Yuba counties.

Food Assistance

The Department of Social Services has created a page specifically to provide information and resources for individuals and families impacted by the October 2017 Wildfires. We have listed some of those services below, but you can find additional information at: http://www.cdss.ca.gov/Media-Center/October-2017-Wildfires

Food Banks, Food Pantries and Soup Kitchens

Tax Resources and Information

Revenue and Taxation Code section 170(a)(1) allows homeowners to apply for reassessment of their property if it has been the damaged or destroyed by Governor-declared disaster.  The county assessor will immediately reappraise the property to reflect its damaged condition.  In addition, when it is rebuilt in a like or similar manner, the property will retain its prior value (Proposition 13) for tax purposes.  If a manufactured home is totally destroyed in a Governor-declared disaster, it may be replaced by a comparable unit without an increase in either the property taxes or the vehicle license and registration fees.

Section 194.1 of the Revenue and Taxation Code allows any owner of eligible property who files a claim for calamity reassessment pursuant to Section 170 on or before the next property tax installment delinquency date (December 10, 2017) to ask the county assessor to defer payment of that installment of property taxes on the regular secured roll for the current fiscal year (deferral does not apply to impound accounts handled by your lender).  The new due date for the deferred taxes will be 30 days after you receive the corrected property tax bill.  If delinquency date falls on a weekend or holiday, as it does in this case, the delinquency date is the next business date.

Napa County: Calamity Reassessment, Property Tax Deferral and Rebuilding Options Letter

Napa County: Base Year Transfer for Properties Damaged or Destroyed by Fire in a Governor Declared Disaster Letter

Coastal Region Landfill Options for Wildfire Debris Removal Contractors

Sonoma County Community Calendar 

Napa County Community Calendar 

Mendocino County Calendar 

Nevada County Community Calendar 

County Specific Information on Housing: Butte, Lake, Nevada, Mendocino, Napa, Orange, Sonoma, Yuba

Housing Support Plan

The Housing Support Plan was developed as an effort of various agencies supporting long and short term housing for survivors and communities impacted by the wildfires. The Housing Support Plan describes:

  • Housing needs in the affected counties;
  • Short- and long-term housing goals;
  • Complexities and potential exacerbating factors;
  • State and federal programs to support housing rebuilding efforts; and
  • A template for creating a locally-focused disaster housing strategy.

This is a living document. It will continue to be updated based on stakeholder input and as additional information and resources are identified. View Housing Support Plan here.

Governor’s Office of Planning and Research – General Plan Guidelines: 2017 Update

News

Fire Management Assistance Grants (FMAG)

On October 9, California Governor’s Office of Emergency Services (Cal OES) Director Mark Ghilarducci secured 10 Fire Management Assistance Grants (FMAG) from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to help ensure the availability of vital resources to suppress wildfires burning statewide. The FMAGs also enable local, state and tribal agencies to recover eligible costs.

FMAGs were approved for the following fires:

Sonoma County Day of Remembrance

Sonoma County Day of Remembrance, Saturday, October 28, 2017 at the Santa Rosa Junior College Bailey Field

From Event Organizers: Community gathering to remember those who we have lost, celebrate community heroes, and support neighbors in need Sonoma County doesn’t give up.

We saw the very best of our County come through during the worst of the terrible fire storm: our resilience, strength and downright grit; our kindness, decency and generosity; and above all, our essential humanity. Those qualities continue to shine today – because that’s just who we are.

That’s why we invite you to join a community wide gathering this Saturday morning, October 28, to remember those who have passed away from the North Bay Fire Storms, support the thousands of our neighbors who have lost their homes and businesses and to thank the countless community heroes who were called to duty in our darkest hours.

The Sonoma County Day of Remembrance will provide all of us a time to reflect, a time to celebrate our community’s heroes and a time to support those who need it most: Our neighbors in need.

The event will feature Fire Department Color Guard and bagpipes, honor guard from local law enforcement, brief choir and musical performances, Interfaith Leaders, Sonoma County Sheriff Rob Giordano, CalFire Chief Ken Pimlott, Santa Rosa Fire Chief Tony Gossner and the ringing of the firefighter memorial bell on behalf of the residents who have passed away from these devastating blazes.

While there will be tough days ahead, there is absolutely no question that we’ll get through this. We’re rebuilding together because we’re Sonoma Strong.

Fierce Santa Ana winds, combined with dry brush and dead trees, fueled the start of multiple fires in Ventura, Los Angeles, San Diego, San Bernardino, Santa Barbara and Riverside counties. The first of the southern California wildfires broke out on the evening of December 4, and fires continued to burn in numerous counties while ongoing dangerous weather conditions persisted. Thousands of acres burned destroying infrastructure, residences, and prompted mass evacuations. The fires closed several major highways, cancelled schools, and threatened historical landmarks.

The State Operations Center activated around the clock to coordinate resources to support the communities affected by fires. State, local and federal agencies continue to work together to support emergency management and recovery efforts.

In support of the wildfires, Oregon, Montana, Utah, Idaho, Texas, New Mexico and Washington sent engines coordinated through the Emergency Management Assistance Compact (EMAC) and an interstate compact to assist with state resources.

As of December 28, the largest wildfire in California history, the Thomas Fire, has destroyed 281,893 acres and is 91% contained.

Thomas Wildfire Incident Information

For Shelter Information, Click Here
Los Angeles – Skirball and Creek Fires
Creek and Skirball Fires: Public Information Frequently Asked Questions (updated 12/07/17)

Important Dates

This calendar list dates, deadlines, and meetings that are important for those affected by the December 2017 Wildfires.

Government & Private Non-Profit Organizations Applicants’ Briefings

FEMA’s Public Assistance (PA) grant program provides federal assistance to government organizations and certain private nonprofit (PNP) organizations following a Presidential disaster declaration. Disaster survivors who need information on grant programs for homeowners and renters should visit FEMA’s Individual Assistance page.

Applicant Briefing Schedule for California

Public Assistance provides grants to state, tribal, territorial, and local governments, and certain types of PNP organizations so that communities can quickly respond to and recover from major disasters or emergencies. Through the program, FEMA provides supplemental federal disaster grant assistance for debris removal, life-saving emergency protective measures, and the repair, replacement, or restoration of disaster-damaged publicly-owned facilities, and the facilities of certain PNP organizations. The PA program also encourages protection of these damaged facilities from future events by providing assistance for hazard mitigation measures during the recovery process.

The Public Assistance Applicants’ Briefings for the October 2017 Wildfires and December 2017 Wildfires have concluded. If you would like more information about the applicants’ briefings, please contact Cal OES Recovery at (916) 845-8200.

DateDescriptionMore InformationAffected County
February 1 to March 15, 2018 by 11:59 pm PSTMitigation is the effort to reduce loss of life and property by lessening the impact of disasters. Mitigation is taking action now—before the next disaster—to reduce human and financial consequences later.

As the result of a Presidential Disaster Declaration, such as the December 2017 Wildfires (FEMA-4353-DR-CA), FEMA’s Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP) funds plans and projects that reduce the effects of future natural disasters. In California, these funds are administered by the Cal OES Hazard Mitigation Grant Program Unit. Eligible applicants include state agencies, local governments, special districts, federally recognized tribes, and some private non-profits.

If your local jurisdiction is interested in submitting a Notice of Interest (NOI) for the FEMA-4353-DR-CA event, please refer to the links in the next column.
For instructions on how to complete the NOI for FEMA-4353-DR-CA, click here.

To complete the NOI for FEMA-4353-DR-CA, click here.

For further information on Cal OES’ Hazard Mitigation Grant Program, visit our website.
Applies to All Counties

News

Presidential Declaration

Fire Management Assistance Grants (FMAG)

State of Emergency Proclamations

Additional Resources

Understanding Individual Assistance and Public Assistance
The Federal Emergency Management Agency may provide two types of assistance, following natural disasters with a presidential disaster declaration: Individual Assistance and Public Assistance. Understanding Individual Assistance and Public Assistance – En Español

After the Fire: Advice for Salvaging Damaged Family Treasures
When evacuating, never risk your personal safety to save belongings. When returning after a fire, wear protective clothing and eyewear to handle items. Hazardous particles may still be in the air and structures will likely be unstable.  FEMA has additional tips and resources to salvage personal items that have survived fires.

National Wildfire Coordinating Group Map
Check fire conditions where you live

How Does This Wildfire Season Compare?
California has endured some of the worst wildfires in United States history. Find out from CAL FIRE how this wildfire disaster compares to other major incidents.

California Wildfires Create New Danger: Hazardous Debris 
Statewide wildfires that scarred communities across Northern and Southern California now pose a new threat. As changing weather patterns and tireless work of more than 11,000 firefighters boost containment lines, communities devastated by the fires face potential health risks associated with the improper handling of fire debris.

Governor Brown Issues Executive Order to Help Cut Red Tape, Expedite Recovery Efforts in Communities Impacted by Wildfires
Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. today issued an executive order to cut red tape and help streamline recovery efforts in communities impacted by the devastating wildfires that have burned across California over the past ten days.

State Health Officer Urges Caution During Wildfire Cleanup
California Department of Public Health (CDPH) Director and State Health Officer Dr. Karen Smith today advised residents of recently burned areas to use caution in cleaning up ash from recent wildfires. (en español)