Debris Removal

Debris Removal FAQs

Click to view a list of Frequently Asked Questions about Debris Removal

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Right of Entry Form

Click to Download the Right of Entry Form

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Debris Removal Contacts

Local County Contacts for Debris Removal

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U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

The U.S. EPA is providing support to FEMA and its state and local partners in the ongoing joint response to multiple fires in Northern California.

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CalRecycle

CalRecycle has prepared resources and guidance to assist with wildfire debris management and disposal, household hazardous waste collection and storage, and ash cleanup and disposal.

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Army Corp of Engineers

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers functions as project manager for debris removal, infrastructure assessment, emergency power, temporary roofing and critical public facility construction.

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Fast Facts

To expedite recovery, state and federal partners will coordinate closely with affected jurisdictions to remove fire debris from single-family residential lots and public facilities.

Fast Facts – Debris Removal FAQs

Fast Facts – Debris Removal FAQs – Español

Private Debris Removal Guidelines
These are basic guidelines the individual counties may incorporate into their formal private debris removal requirements.

State/Federal Wildfire Debris Removal Program
Here’s a list of the types of debris that are eligible and not eligible for removal.

Where is all this debris going? Click here to see a list of landfills that have been identified to possibly receive debris from this disaster.

The deadline for all Right-of-Entry forms is November 13, 2017, however each county may have an earlier deadline for paperwork to be submitted. Please check with your county ahead of time.


The following actions are underway:

  • State and FEMA liaisons are coordinating with County officials to obtain Right of Entry (ROE) permissions from property owners and to identify lots and prioritize work.
  • Prioritization will be based on a strategic approach to expediently restore critical services and facilities.
  • State and Federal agencies will ensure county approvals and consistent coordination as part of the task force.
  • There are two phases to this operation:
    1.  Household Hazardous Waste
    2.  Debris and Ash Removal

Debris Operations by County and Program

Phase One: Household Hazardous Waste Operations by County and Program

CountyAgencyMobilizationAssessmentCollection & Removal
ButteDTSCCompleteCompleteComplete
LakeDTSCCompleteCompleteComplete
MendocinoDTSCCompleteCompleteStarted 10/23
NapaUSEPACompleteCompleteStarted 10/26
NevadaDTSCCompleteCompleteComplete
SonomaUSEPACompleteCompleteStarted 10/26
YubaDTSCCompleteCompleteComplete

DTSC: Department of Toxic Substances Control
USEPA: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

Phase 2. Debris and Ash Removal Operations by County and Program

CountyAgency
ButteCalRecycle
LakeUSACE
MendocinoUSACE
NapaUSACE
NevadaCalRecycle
SonomaUSACE
YubaCalRecycle

CalRecycle: California Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery
USACE: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers


US EPA Clean Up Progress Map

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is working with local, state and federal partners on the response to the Northern California fires. EPA is leading the survey, collection and disposal of household hazardous waste (HHW) at nearly 7,000 residential and commercial parcels affected by the fires in Sonoma and Napa counties.

Click on the link below to follow the progress of cleanup efforts.
https://epa.maps.arcgis.com/apps/Cascade/index.html?appid=c99233f891514778aa9ee91f41537d85


Safety Resources:

Property owners who desire to search debris from their properties for possible salvageable items, should do with caution and appropriate protective gear: eye protection, masks, and gloves.
https://calepa.ca.gov/disaster/fire/
https://www.cdc.gov/disasters/wildfires/index.html
https://calepa.ca.gov/wp-content/uploads/sites/34/2016/10/Disaster-Documents-FireAsh.pdf

Tips for Protecting Yourself from Asbestos


5 Steps to Cleaning up a Household Fire

Step 1: Household Hazardous Waste Removal

WHO: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency or Department of Toxic Substance Control depending on location.

WHAT: Clearing homes of remaining household hazardous waste, including propane tanks, compressed gas cylinders and solvents.

STEP 2: Asbestos Inspection and Removal

WHO: Department of Toxic and Substance Control and US Environmental Protection and related contractor

WHAT: Testing properties for asbestos and removal of large obvious chunks of asbestos material.

STEP 3: Site Documentation

WHO: CalRecycle or US Army Corps of Engineers and related contractor

WHAT: Documenting the state of the property before removal of debris, including details of property size, units in an apartment building, number of cars and similar information.

STEP 4: Ash and Debris Clean-up

WHO:  CalRecycle or US Army Corps of Engineers and related contractor

WHAT: Removal of all debris and ash, scraping lot clean. Homeowner will be contacted 24-48 hours before this step occurs.

STEP 5: Erosion Control

WHO: CalRecycle or US Army Corps of Engineers and related contractor

WHAT: Erosion control measures to be determined property by property.

Protect Your Lungs from Fire Smoke (California Department of Public Health)
Safe Cleanup of Fire Ash (California Department of Toxic Substance Control)

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)