Fast Facts – Debris Removal For Agricultural and Commercial Structures FAQs

Fast Facts – Debris Removal For Agricultural and Commercial Structures (PDF)

The Consolidated Debris Removal Program has two phases: removal of household hazardous waste and removal of other fire-related debris.
In Phase I, county, state and federal agencies have organized teams of experts from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) and the California State Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC) to inspect your property and remove any household hazardous waste that may pose a threat to human health, animals, and the environment such as batteries, asbestos siding, and paints.
In Phase II, Cal OES, FEMA and local officials are coordinating with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) and CalRecycle to execute contracts and conduct fire-related debris removal from your property.

Phase II will include debris and ash removal related to any structures on your residential property that are destroyed. Driveways will be retained as much as possible both for possible reuse and also to serve as a staging area for debris removal and rebuilding equipment.

Commercial agricultural properties or structures are NOT eligible to participate in the Consolidated Debris Removal Program. However, they may be eligible if it presents an immediate threat to public health and safety or the environment. This is determined on a case-by-case basis.

Residential homes and public infrastructure that have been completely destroyed by the fires are eligible for the Consolidated Debris Removal Program. Commercial agricultural properties or structures are NOT eligible to participate in the Consolidated Debris Removal Program. However, they may be eligible if it presents an immediate threat to public health and safety or the environment. This is determined on a case-by-case basis.

Commercial property or structures are NOT eligible to participate in the Consolidated Debris Removal Program. However, they may be eligible if it presents an immediate threat to public health and safety or the environment. This is determined on a case-by-case basis.

Residential homes that have been completely destroyed by the fires are eligible for the Consolidated Debris Removal Program. Partially damaged homes are not eligible for the program. If you are unsure if your house qualifies for the debris removal program, submit a Right-of-Entry form to your local government for assessment.

Commercial agricultural properties or structures are NOT eligible to participate in the Consolidated Debris Removal Program.

If you have a specified amount for debris removal in your insurance
policy (for example, 5 percent of the value of a primary structure, other
structure, and personal property), you may use your insurance proceeds
first to remove fire related debris that is ineligible for removal under the
program (e.g., swimming pools, patios, trees, etc…). The county will
only collect any money that remains in your insurance policy, if any, after
you have removed ineligible fire related debris.

If you have a policy that includes the costs of debris removal in the total proceeds
provided for the primary structure, other structure, or personal property, you may
use these proceeds to pay for the removal of fire related debris that is ineligible
for removal under the program. The county will only collect any money that
remains in your insurance policy, if any, after the rebuild and removal of
ineligible fire related debris. The homeowner will not owe the county any
additional money for debris removal.

The property owner will be required to substantiate all expenditures.

It is standard business practice for subcontractors to file a preliminary lien notice with the property owner on any work they perform as a way to ensure they preserve their rights in the event they do not get paid. These notices also inform the property owner which contractor did any work on their property. In the case of a federal contract, like the debris removal contracts that USACE issued to AshBritt and ECC, there is a payment and performance bond to ensure all subcontractors/vendors receive payment for the services they perform on a specific property. However, not all subcontractors are familiar with federal contracting and are simply filing preliminary lien notices routinely. Thus, property owners are not financially responsible for work done by sub-contractors under these federal
contracts. If property owners receive a preliminary lien notice, they should attempt to confirm with the sub-contractor filing the preliminary notice that the work was done under one of the federal contracts. If so, payment for this work is covered by the prime contractors payment bonds. USACE has firmly directed our prime contractors to inform their subcontractors that the prime contractor is required to have payment bonds filed with USACE and reassure them that they will get paid for the work done for property owners who have signed an ROE.